While you and your current spouse agreed to a collaborative divorce, you must still protect yourself for the next chapter of your life. For instance, you need health coverage no matter your marital status.

If you relied on your soon-to-be-ex-spouse’s health care plan, learn how to continue receiving coverage with help from WebMD. Use these tips to give yourself one less thing to worry about.

Look into COBRA

You may know about the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, but did you know it applies to divorcing spouses? If your current spouse’s employer has at least 20 employees and a company health insurance plan, you can remain on your spouse’s plan for 36 months. That said, you bear responsibility for paying all monthly premiums. Talk to your spouse’s employer so you know how much you can expect to pay each month, a conversation to have within 60 days of your divorce.

A second option is to see if your employer offers a health insurance plan that offers the same coverage as what you have now at a price you can afford. Ask an HR representative if this is an option and if enrollment remains open. Even if you missed the enrollment deadline, getting a divorce could qualify as an exception.

Consider adding insurance to the divorce settlement

A second option is including health coverage as part of the divorce settlement. Because you want your divorce to remain collaborative, ask your current spouse how she or he feels about including health coverage payments in the divorce settlement. Even if she or he only agrees to pay a portion, that could suit your new budget.

Maintaining your physical and mental health is essential during a divorce. Take steps to ensure you have coverage after concluding all divorce proceedings.